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STACKING CHAIR
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PRODUCT DETAILS

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DESCRIPTION

 

Frame:

FIBRE DE VERRE

 

Surface:
HIGH POLISH FINISH

MEASUREMENTS

PRODUCT BOX SIZE

PRODUCT SIZE

MATERIAL

Fiberglass is a substance comprised of tiny glass threads, or fibers. Fiberglass materials are popular for their attributes of high strength compared to relatively light weight. Material: FRP (Fiberglass Reinforced Plastic), hand-made product, water proofed. Fiberglass has the advantage over glass because it transmits less heat. During the summer a fiberglass covered greenhouse requires less cooling than a glass greenhouse of the same size. Fiberglass with PVC is a durable, relatively lightweight material that resists damage from weather, ultraviolet radiation, and acid rain.

COLOR VARIATION

RED FIBERGLASS

WHITE FIBERGLASS

BLACK FIBERGLASS

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THE DESIGNER OF THE ORIGINAL

Verner Panto

Even if Verner Panton’s creative output was reduced to the eponymous Panton Chair, his name would still be assured in the pantheon of modern design. With the Panton Chair, the first example of single-formed injection moulded plastic seating, Panton succeeded in creating one of the most daring and famous chair designs of the twentieth century. Born on the island of Funen in Denmark, Panton came to design, like many of his colleagues, via the study of architecture at the Academy of Art in Copenhagen. After graduating, Panton landed an apprenticeship at the office of Arne Jacobsen, assigned to assist the master on the iconic “Ant” Chair. Although deeply influenced by the organic forms of Jacobsen and others typical of 1958. Panton first established himself at the forefront of avant-garde design with furniture based on extravagant, geometric forms and use of strong colors, such as the Cone Chair of 1958. Along with the Panton Chair, which was designed in the early 1960’s, but was not put into production until 1967 due to its technical challenges, these designs cemented Verner Panton’s reputation as a designer of an original and uncompromising approach. Working with renowned manufacturers such as Fritz Hansen, Louis Poulsen, and Vitra, Panton fearlessly pushed technology to its limits and produced design icons such as the “Flowerpot” Lamp and the “Pantower”.